Did It Work?

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This session will explore the fourth LEADerS strategy: Did it work? This session helps WITS LEADerS reflect on their behaviour patterns and to consider necessary changes in order to sustain healthy relationships with their peers.

Introduction

To begin, show students the LEADerS poster, and review the first first three strategies: Look and listen, Explore points of view, and Act.
Next show students the Ouch! Your Silence Hurts poster and discuss the following question:

  1. What are five reasons why it is sometimes challenging to Act when we see someone being hurt by someone else?
  • We don’t want to be the next target. (If you can’t intervene then at least find help.)
  • We want to belong. (You are not alone. Chances are that others also feel uncomfortable with the situation.)
  • We convince ourselves it’s not that bad. (Talking to someone is not tattling.)
  • We think no one will help. (If the person you approach doesn’t respond, keeping seeking help until someone does.)
  • We wonder if the person deserved to be mistreated. (No one deserves to be harmed. We all need help sometimes.)

Activities

Each activity in this segment will take one or two classes to complete. Activities are divided into three levels:

  • GETTING STARTED ACTIVITIES: Suitable for students being introduced to LEADerS for the first time.
  • NEXT STEP ACTIVITIES: Used to reinforce LEADerS strategies that have been introduced in a previous session or year.
  • REINFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES: Suitable for students who have been using the LEADerS Programs for two or more years.

Getting Started Activities

Complete one of the Getting Started Activities below and then conduct a novel study of the book Jake Drake, Bully Buster by Andrew Clements. Use the questions and activities in the book’s associated lesson plan to reinforce the Did it work? strategy.

1. CHOICES

Materials

Poker chips or coloured beads

Exercise

Gather a bag of poker chips or coloured beads and ask students to take a small handful from the bag. After everyone has their handful, tell them that specific colours are worth a certain dollar value.
Ask students, “Now that you know that certain colours are worth more, who would like to choose some different colours?”

Discussion

Explain to students that decisions are made the same way. Discuss how decision-making is not a static one-time event. A decision may not result in consequences you expected so you may have to explore other choices and follow an alternate process.

2. MODIFY MY ACTION

Exercise

This activity requires that students understand the meaning of a verb and an adverb. Divide students into pairs in which one student is ‘A’ and the other student is ‘B.’
Give the ‘A’ students a list of verbs to act out in front of ‘B’ students. Once ‘B’ students have viewed the action and accurately guessed the verb, they will say an adverb that must now be included in their partner’s action. Allow students to try several verbs and adverbs. Possible verbs and adverbs include:

Modify My Action

Discussion

Discuss as a whole class how the addition of an adverb changed the verb. Connect this change with the choices we make when faced with challenges. Sometimes we need to rethink or change our actions when new perspectives or unexpected results happen.

Next Step Activities

The Girls

Complete one of the Next Step Activities below and then conduct a novel study of the book The Girls by Amy Goldman Koss. Use the questions and activities in the book’s associated lesson plan to reinforce the Did it work? strategy.

1. RISKS AND BENEFITS

Discussion

For every choice we make there are inevitable consequences that can be negative and/or positive. Decisions are usually influenced by potential risks and benefits. Discuss examples of these six main risks and benefits with your students.

Risks and Benefits

2. ACTIONS AND CONSEQUENCES

Materials

Action and Consequences handout

Exercise

Sometimes there is a chance to modify your actions to get the best possible outcome. Distribute the Action and Consequences handout. Ask students to read each of the scenarios and write down possible risks, consequences, and results.
After students have considered possible consequences, they should generate more ideas under the Further Actions column to achieve the best possible result(s).

Reinforcement Activities

Blubber

Complete one of the Reinforcement Activities below and then conduct a novel study of the book Blubber by Judy Blume. Use the questions and activities in the book’s associated lesson plan to reinforce the Did it work? strategy.

1. DID IT WORK? SCENARIOS

Materials

Scenarios handout

Exercise

An important part of responding constructively to a problem is identifying the outcomes of our actions. Once you have made a decision to Act, how do you know your actions were successful? What questions should you ask? Distribute the Scenarios handout to small groups of students and ask them to read each scenario to determine if the strategies tried by the people in the story worked to bring about the desired results.

Discussion

Once the small groups have discussed the scenarios, discuss their opinions as a large group. Summarize the answers from the small groups with the objective of determining some common criteria that indicate success in trying a strategy.
Possible common criteria may include:

  • A decrease in negative behaviour or communication
  • A sense of acceptance or belonging
  • An understanding of perspectives by all people
  • A sense of safety

2. DID IT WORK? WALK-ABOUT GALLERY

Materials

  • Large chart paper folded in half lengthways
  • Felt pens
  • Sticky notes

Exercise

Write out the scenarios from the previous activity on the left side of large pieces of chart paper. Write only one scenario on each chart. Divide the class into small groups, assigning one scenario to each, and ask them to write possible strategies for resolving the issue described on their paper. Their resolutions should be based on the desired results described in the previous activity:

  • A decrease in negative behaviour or communication
  • A sense of acceptance or belonging
  • An understanding of perspectives by all people
  • A sense of safety
  • Other ideas generated by the class

Rotate the chart papers so that every group has a chance to read each scenario and write resolution strategies. Once all the groups have written on each chart paper, post the papers around the room. Distribute sticky notes to each student and tell them to vote for the resolution they think is best for each scenario by placing their sticky beside it.

Discussion

When the “voting” has been completed discuss the potential for the resolutions that garnered the most votes as well as others that would be suitable for the situation.

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