Jayde The Jaybird


Jayde The Jaybird

Jayde The Jaybird

Buy Jayde The Jaybird from Amazon What is this?
Jayde, who has one wing that is smaller than the other, can’t always fly as fast as some of the other children. She tries out new things and finds out she really likes to sing. At first she hides her talent but later her singing saves the day when Hank the Hawk threatens her family.

By Brandee Bublé

Jayde, who has one wing that is smaller than the other, can’t always fly as fast as some of the other children. She tries out new things and finds out she really likes to sing. At first she hides her talent but later her singing saves the day when Hank the Hawk threatens her family.

View lesson plan in PDF

WITS LEADS Connection: Seek help! Tolerance, Social & Emotional Learning

 


Questions and Activities

PRE-READING QUESTIONS

  1. What kind of bird is a Jay Bird? Do you have any Jay birds in your neighbourhood?

    Jay Bird Jay Bird

  2. Look at the book’s cover. What is Jayde doing?
  3. What do all the symbols on the cover mean? Does anyone play a musical instrument? Do you know a song with musical notes? (“Doe a Deer a female deer…”).

    Music

  4. Rhyming: How are the words “swing” and “sing” alike? (They sound alike and look alike) How are they different? What is another word that is hidden in “swing” that also rhymes? (wing)

POST-READING QUESTIONS

  1. P. 3-4 Do you notice anything different about Jayde compared to the other birds? (One wing is smaller- this really isn’t obvious at first and may be evident only after they are told). How do you think this happened (accident, born that way)? What is hard for Jayde to do? What are some things that are hard to do?
  2. What helps kids do things that are hard? (practice, trying, getting help, lessons) What kinds of equipment can make up for differences in our ability to see or hear or walk? (glasses, hearing aids, wheel chairs, ramps, buttons to open doors).

    P. 5-6 What are the new things Jayde tries to do? What was easy for her to do?

    What have you tried that is hard for you to do? How do things that are hard at first get easier (practice, opportunities)? Why is it hard to do something for the first time? (Balance, coordination, knowing what to do, need to take a lesson).

  3. (a) If someone is better at doing something than you are, how might you feel? (Jealous, embarrassed, like you don’t want people to know, like you should be better, worry about getting teased, don’t really care.

    (b) Should everyone be able to skate or ski by the time they are in your grade? Why? Why not? (NB: children often compare themselves to others and think they fall short but they just have not had a chance to try doing the thing that someone else can do.) What are the reasons some people are better than others (older, practiced more, had more chances to try it out, took lessons, have other people in their family who like to do it)

  4. Why does Jayde hide her ability to sing at first (she does not want to be: different, get teased, look like a show off, or brag about her talent?) What happens when she does share her talent? (She warns her family of the danger. She gets all of the other animals to work together to help scare Hank away.) Why wasn’t Jayde afraid to sing after that (Everyone liked her singing. They cheered and encouraged her to sing again.) How do you feel when people encourage you to keep trying something new?
  5. What happens when you ask for help to do something you find hard? (learn how to do it, get better at it) What if no one listens when you ask for help? What can you do? (wait until the person is not busy or ask someone else!)
  6. What kind of birds are Hank and Olivia? (Hank the Hawk, Olivia the Owl).

POST-READING ACTIVITIES

  1. See paintings of birds by Canadian Robert Bateman (Click Here).
  2. Cut out the birds you see in your neighbourhood or have the children take photos of birds they see. Create a mural of the birds that children see in their back yards. Make a chart to see which bird was seen by most of the children.
  3. Have each child pick a bird and find out what the bird eats, where it lives, what kind of house it has, and how it sounds. Can you make the same sound as the bird?
  4. Think about a new thing you (or the class) would like to do? How could you get started? What would you need to get better? (catching a ball, hopscotch, drawing a tree..)
  5. Rhyming: Make up a WITS song or poem with rhymes. Try out this sign language song! https://vimeo.com/112084985
  6. Alliteration: make up words that start with the same letter as your name and that describe you. (Daring David, Kind Ken, Creative Cathy, Helpful Henry)!

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply