Enemy Pie

Enemy Pie

Enemy Pie

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By Derek Munson

A little boy is hurt when a neighbour strikes him out in a baseball game and then has a party to celebrate. When he tells his father about it, his father makes an enemy pie that is guaranteed to get rid of enemies – but only if the boy spends a full day with his enemy first. The boy discovers that his neighbour is not so bad after all.

View lesson plan in PDF

WITS Connection: Talk it out, Seek help


Learning Outcomes

    1. Select your province to see learning outcomes for this lesson.

Questions and Activities

PRE-READING ACTIVITIES

  • Give students strips of paper and ask them to write what they would put in an enemy pie. Have students read the strips aloud and then put them in a pie plate.

PRE-READING QUESTIONS

  1. What does enemy mean? Give an example of a situation that involves an enemy.
  2. Look closely at the cover of the book. What is the opposite of my “best enemy”?

POST-READING QUESTIONS

  1. How did the main character use his WITS to deal with Jeremy? He talked it out and sought help from his father.
  2. How was the main character changing as he spent his day with his neighbour, Jeremy? He started seeing that Jeremy wasn’t really an enemy.
  3. What did he discover about his enemy? He discovered that his enemy enjoyed the same activities he did and that he was fun to be around.
  4. What message or lesson is there for us? Before we make a judgment about someone we should get to know them first.
  5. What can happen when you give people a chance or ‘the benefit of the doubt’?

POST-READING ACTIVITIES

  • Empty the pie plate students filled before reading the story. Give students new strips of paper and ask them to write what they would put in an enemy pie now.
  • Write these words on the board: Before, Talk it Out, Seek Help and After. Have students describe the protagonist’s feelings at the beginning of the story and write their ideas under “Before.” Under “Talk It Out” and “Seek Help” describe how he shared his feelings. Under “After” describe how his feelings changed.
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