Bully Dance

Bully Dance

Produced by the National Film Board of Canada

A community is disrupted when a bully victimizes a smaller member of the group. Eventually, the whole community becomes involved in dealing with the bully, who is himself a victim in his own house. This short animated film examines the roles of peer pressure, accountability and power struggles in bullying.

View lesson plan in PDF

WITS LEADS Connection: Act


Questions

PRE-VIEWING QUESTIONS

  1. Based on the title, what do you think this video is about?
  2. In this animated video, the characters are personified animals. What does that mean? Animals who act like people.
  3. The video has no dialogue. What is dialogue? Conversations. How will you know what is happening without it? By reading body language to learn about the characters and their feelings. By observing what they do and what that reveals about them.

POST-VIEWING QUESTIONS

  1. What problem was faced in the video? One of the characters was targeted by a bully and his friends. He was injured before the problem was solved.
  2. What did the bystanders do when they saw the character being bullied? Some joined in and laughed at the character. Others ran away when the bully intimidated them, leaving the character alone to be beat up.
  3. What did the adults do? When the character was being excluded from the circle, they eventually made the others let him in. One of the bully’s parents appeared to be abusive to him (i.e. parent curled his fist when confronted).
  4. What is a role model? What is a “good” role model?
  5. Review the examples of bullying behaviour class generated before viewing the video. Which of these did you observe in the video?
  6. How did the bully take responsibility for his actions and make amends to the character he bullied – or did he? Who might be the next target? What other solutions might there be?
  7. Do you think the title Bully Dance is appropriate for this film? Why or why not?
  8. What are bystanders? Introduce the Bully Circle poster and show students how bystanders can ignore, join or help those being bullied.

WATCH BULLY DANCE A SECOND TIME, ASKING STUDENTS TO FOCUS ON THE ROLE BYSTANDERS PLAY IN THE VIDEO.

SECOND POST-VIEWING QUESTIONS

  1. Who were the bystanders? Teachers, parents and students.
  2. Why do you think the bystanders did not help? They were afraid of getting hurt, afraid of being the new target, afraid they would make it worse, they did not know what to do, etc.

ACTIVITIES

1. ROLE PLAY

Discussion

Talk with students about the important role bystanders can play and how students can use WITS and LEADS strategies to recognize, refuse to accept and report bullying. Discuss the importance of being assertive or calling for help.

Exercise

  • Stop the video at the lunchroom scene (3:33) and have the students play the roles of the bystanders but change their actions in order to stop the bullying.
  • Repeat for the gym scene where the character is hit from behind (5:22) and the playground scene where he is beat up (6:02).

2. LETTER WRITING

Exercise

  • Introduce or review with your students how to format a personal letter.
  • Assign students to write a letter to the bully in Bully Dance, advising him to take responsibility for his actions and make amends to his victim.

3. THE PERFECT PLAYGROUND

Exercise

  • Have children close their eyes and imagine the perfect playground filled with kids of all ages. Everyone is happy and doing different activities.
  • Ask children to imagine taking a look around the perfect playground and then make a list of what they don‘t see.
  • Ask children to share their answers with the class.

Discussion

Ask students to identify typical conflicts that happen on the playground and how these problems get handled. Discuss other ways of handling them and what would happen if these solutions were put into action instead.

WHAT KIDS SAY: What do you imagine when you see the perfect playground?

  • “No one is left out for being different.”
  • “No unhappy kids.”
  • “No one fighting.”
  • “No bullying.”
  • “No bickering.”
  • “No crying.”
  • “No one using violence to solve problems.”
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